Courses

Medical Gross Anatomy

Medical Gross Anatomy

I am frequently asked, “Why are you teaching human anatomy in a medical school if you’re a paleontologist?” There are a couple reasons. First, humans essentially have the same bones and muscles as every other animal with a backbone (vertebrate). Therefore, teaching human anatomy is not that difficult for a vertebrate paleontologist who studies the […]

Read More →

Read More →

Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck  (ANAT 516)

Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck (ANAT 516)

The Department of Anatomy offers two regionally-focused advanced electives in surgical anatomy for M.S. in Applied Anatomy students and medical students (generally those in their final year). I direct ANAT 516 (ANAT 4002M), which focuses on the head and neck and is mainly taught by clinical faculty, particularly surgeons. The primary goal of the course […]

Read More →

Read More →

Mammal Diversity and Evolution (BIOL 345/445)

Mammal Diversity and Evolution (BIOL 345/445)

This four credit-hour course focuses on the anatomical and taxonomic diversity of mammals in an evolutionary context. The emphasis is on living (extant) mammals, but extinct mammals are also discussed. Weekly meetings include two student-led seminars (Tu/Th from 2:45‐4:00 PM) and one lab (Wednesday from 2-5 pm). Most labs take place at the Cleveland Museum […]

Read More →

Read More →

Graduate Gross Anatomy (ANAT 411)

Graduate Gross Anatomy (ANAT 411)

The graduate gross anatomy course (ANAT 411) is one of four core courses taken by M.S. in Applied Anatomy students in the Department of Anatomy. The M.S. in Applied Anatomy  is a non-thesis (Plan B) Master’s degree that can be pursued by itself or in conjunction with the M.D. at CWRU. Gross anatomy and the […]

Read More →

Read More →

Mammal Orders and Families

Mammal Orders and Families

Below is a current list of mammal families and higher taxonomic groups compiled for the course Mammal Diversity and Evolution (ANAT/BIOL 345/445). It is primarily based on Wilson and Reeder (2005), though it also includes various extinct families and recent taxonomic updates to extant families based on the scientific literature. I have divided the taxonomic groups […]

Read More →

Read More →

Top