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Chucal

Chucal

Chucal is located in the Altiplano (high plateau) of northern Chile at an elevation nearly 4,500 m. As far as we are aware, it is the highest vertebrate fossil locality in the western hemisphere. It is also among the highest vertebrate fossil sites in the world. The area was at a much lower elevation when its fossils were […]

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Sheltopusik (<em>Ophisaurus apodus</em>)

Sheltopusik (Ophisaurus apodus)

The sheltopusik, also known as the European legless lizard, certainly does not look like a lizard at first glance; it is long, thin, and lacks any functional limbs. As a result, it is commonly mistaken for a snake. (It’s name, in fact, means “snake lizard.”) Not having limbs does not make something a snake, however. […]

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Science Café Cleveland

Science Café Cleveland

Science Café Cleveland is an opportunity for members of the public to learn more about science and scientific research in a fun and informal atmosphere of good food, good beer, and good conversation. It takes place on the second Monday evening of every month. For many years, it met at the Tasting Room  at Great […]

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Basal typotheres (Oldfieldthomasiidae, Archaeopithecidae)

Basal typotheres (Oldfieldthomasiidae, Archaeopithecidae)

The evolutionary relationships of most notoungulates are not entirely clear. This is particularly true for notoungulates that diverged prior to the split between typotheres and toxodonts (basal notoungulates) and early members of the Typotheria (basal typotheres). Basal typotheres are generally placed in the families Oldfieldthomasiidae and Archaeopithecidae, but although some phylogenetic analysis have found these to be […]

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Society for the Study of Mammalian Evolution (SSME)

Society for the Study of Mammalian Evolution (SSME)

The Journal of Mammalian Evolution is a multidisciplinary journal devoted to studies on the comparative morphology, molecular biology, paleobiology, genetics, developmental and reproductive biology, biogeography, systematics, ethology and ecology, and population dynamics of mammals and the ways that these diverse data can be analyzed for the reconstruction of mammalian evolution. The journal publishes high-quality peer-reviewed […]

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Medical Gross Anatomy

Medical Gross Anatomy

I am frequently asked, “Why are you teaching human anatomy in a medical school if you’re a paleontologist?” There are a couple reasons. First, humans essentially have the same bones and muscles as every other animal with a backbone (vertebrate). Therefore, teaching human anatomy is not that difficult for a vertebrate paleontologist who studies the […]

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Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck  (ANAT 516)

Surgical Anatomy of the Head and Neck (ANAT 516)

The Department of Anatomy offers two regionally-focused advanced electives in surgical anatomy for M.S. in Applied Anatomy students and medical students (generally those in their final year). I direct ANAT 516 (ANAT 4002M), which focuses on the head and neck and is mainly taught by clinical faculty, particularly surgeons. The primary goal of the course […]

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Mammal Diversity and Evolution (BIOL 345/445)

Mammal Diversity and Evolution (BIOL 345/445)

This four credit-hour course focuses on the anatomical and taxonomic diversity of mammals in an evolutionary context. The emphasis is on living (extant) mammals, but extinct mammals are also discussed. Weekly meetings include two student-led seminars (Tu/Th from 2:45‐4:00 PM) and one lab (Wednesday from 2-5 pm). Most labs take place at the Cleveland Museum […]

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Graduate Gross Anatomy (ANAT 411)

Graduate Gross Anatomy (ANAT 411)

The graduate gross anatomy course (ANAT 411) is one of four core courses taken by M.S. in Applied Anatomy students in the Department of Anatomy. The M.S. in Applied Anatomy  is a non-thesis (Plan B) Master’s degree that can be pursued by itself or in conjunction with the M.D. at CWRU. Gross anatomy and the […]

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“Typical” Typothere Tooth

“Typical” Typothere Tooth

When a mammal tooth erupts, it has a continuous covering of enamel.  However, in many herbivores that eat abrasive foodstuffs, the enamel covering on the surface wears away, exposing the dentine underneath. (Since humans and other primates eat relatively soft foods, we mostly maintain the enamel covering of our teeth throughout our lifetime.)  If the […]

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